Applications Everywhere!!

We are finding that our Vision-in-Motion technology is proving to be even more potent than we thought.  Everywhere we look we see another application that becomes feasible with our new vision systems. We've learned that what used to be considered a 3D vision system problem can readily be addressed with our Vision-in-Motion 2½D.

The reason this matters, is that processing with our 2½D technology is drastically faster- perhaps 10X faster, than existing 3D approaches.  And that kind of a speed advantage makes the difference between an application that is practical for real-world use and one that is not.  Here are some examples:

Visually-guided Box Picking   In a production environment, there are countless applications involving boxes- depalletizing boxes, palletizing boxes, packing boxes, putting boxes into secondary packaging, and so on. Instead of spending money on expensive fixturing, visually-guided box handling makes it possible to pick and orient boxes as a human might do. And if boxes are arriving on a conveyor or down a chute, with our  Vision-in-Motion  technology, we can pick them while they are moving,  without requiring conveyor synchronization.  Even more, our vision-guided performance is essentially as fast as a blind robot!

Visually-guided Box Picking

In a production environment, there are countless applications involving boxes- depalletizing boxes, palletizing boxes, packing boxes, putting boxes into secondary packaging, and so on. Instead of spending money on expensive fixturing, visually-guided box handling makes it possible to pick and orient boxes as a human might do. And if boxes are arriving on a conveyor or down a chute, with our Vision-in-Motion technology, we can pick them while they are moving, without requiring conveyor synchronization. Even more, our vision-guided performance is essentially as fast as a blind robot!

Following a Line   There are many applications that require following a templated line or pattern in order to cut a shape out of a piece of material. Rigid materials such as steel are fairly straightforward for traditional robots to follow a pattern.  But what happens if the material is flexible like  rubber ,  fabric , or  plastic ? What if it moves or deforms while being cut? That would require a vision system that can maintain its course even when things move a bit, like our  Vision-in-Motion  technology can do. We're currently working on a research project for a large manufacturer facing exactly that problem. In this image we're investigating the tracing of an outline using a pencil as a stylus.

Following a Line

There are many applications that require following a templated line or pattern in order to cut a shape out of a piece of material. Rigid materials such as steel are fairly straightforward for traditional robots to follow a pattern.

But what happens if the material is flexible like rubber, fabric, or plastic? What if it moves or deforms while being cut? That would require a vision system that can maintain its course even when things move a bit, like our Vision-in-Motion technology can do. We're currently working on a research project for a large manufacturer facing exactly that problem. In this image we're investigating the tracing of an outline using a pencil as a stylus.